Amaella – Lingerie with certified organic cotton & free from toxic chemicals.

Amaella – Lingerie with certified organic cotton & free from toxic chemicals.

Amaella. Pic Ana KArine Neves

As a woman and a wheelchair user, I find it very difficult to find lingerie that is comfortable and beautiful at the same time. As I am in a sitting position sometimes the underwear can harm my skin if it is too tight.  I want a softer material and I also want it to be sustainable and organic, so I was delighted to come across AmaElla. I think lingerie needs to be pleasant to see as it also an important piece for seduction. It is hard is to find sexy underwear that feels right to use.

AmaElla is gorgeous and it’s organic. I had the honour to meet the owner and she explained to me her concept. I did a photoshoot with it and became an Amaella lover. They also have pyjamas and other items.

I thought I would share this bit with you:

samanta bullock wheelchair model brand amaella lingerie
AmaElla Picture- Ana Karine Neves

Our skin is the largest organ of our body and taking good care of it will benefit our health. Everything that is in contact with our skin can be absorbed; nightwear and lingerie is no exception. Traditional cotton is treated with pesticides and synthetic toxins that have been demonstrated to have a direct impact on our health. Toxic chemicals on our clothes have been associated with problems in women’s hormonal health and even with increasing the likelihood of developing breast cancer. Sounds pretty scary, right?

samanta bullock wheelchair model brand amaella lingerie cotton
Amaela Pict by Ana Karine Neves

Because we care about your health, we only use certified organic cotton and materials free from toxic chemicals. At AmaElla every material has been tested for harmful substances by independent organizations such as GOTS and OEKO-TEX.

OUR GOTS ORGANIC COTTON USED IN NIGHTWEAR AND LINGERIE IS FREE FROM:

  • Formaldehyde: one of the most carcinogenic chemicals and related to skin reactions. Besides its health risks, it’s widely used to prevent clothes from wrinkling and shrinking.
  • Aromatic solvents
  • Functional nanoparticles
  • Genetically modified organism (GMO)
  • Chlorine bleaching

All chemical inputs in GOTS organic cotton (e.g. dyes, auxiliaries and process chemicals) are biodegradable, so they are safe for your skin and the environment.

OUR OEKO-TEX STANDARD 100 COMPONENTS ARE FREE FROM:

  • Several hundred of harmful chemicals including pesticides, carcinogenic colourants and heavy metals
  • Legally banned and controlled substances (such as banned Azo colourants, formaldehyde, pentachlorophenol, cadmium, nickel, etc.)
  • Any unwanted remaining substances. These substances usually come from chemicals used for fabric easy-care properties such as colour longevity, easy iron finishing, dimension stability, etc.

Check them out for some more information on their products, here is the link: https://www.amaella.com/?v=79cba1185463

Love Sam

 

Fashion & Disability an Open Letter

Fashion & Disability an Open Letter

In 2018, it is not enough to have simply survived life’s obstacles – or even to thrive despite them. For me, as a paraplegic model, ambassador, parathlete, wife, and woman, to live my best life is to embrace my challenges.

Everyday, I accept myself. My legs, though at times I dislike them, are mine; though I don’t see them represented or reflected in the magazines and stores I browse in, they are here to stay. I’ve learned to love my body for all that it is. But still in 2018, and despite great progress towards diversity, it feels that there is much to be done to convince fashion to respect bodies like mine.

There are people like me all over the world growing up without any reference to their part or place in society; without seeing others, like themselves, living a full and fulfilling life. Still, it is as though having a disability is to be invisible – to have the full spectrum of who you are and who you could potentially become, ignored.

Beyond navigating the stigma, misconceptions, prejudice and doubts about what I, as a disabled person can achieve, I am working passionately to make sure that I see myself represented

samanta bullock wheelchair model abled body young
Before my accident – Samanta Bullock 1992

in my industry. I challenge myself to work fearlessly in fashion, so that others like me feel confident that they can not just survive their own obstacles, but thrive and embrace them too.

I want to make the industry I’ve worked in for 30 years, more inclusive. My drive comes from my experience growing up, working as a model in Brazil; having my accident and then feeling like my dreams had been taken away from me. This stage in my life lead me to the next – to becoming number one tennis champion in Brazil; to being signed to a modelling agency, representing top brands like the BBC and Toyota; and to featuring on the runways at London Fashion Week. Now, I’m channelling my passions towards making a difference – towards an industry that embraces and celebrates disabled bodies.

I want the next generation of disabled children and adults to see people just like them, working in all aspects of the fashion industry. I want to see disabled designers, stylists, makeup artists and photographers involved in major brands and fashion shows. In fashion’s future, there’s a place for blind and partially sighted people, deaf people, people in wheelchairs, people with learning disabilities – disabled people who have all sorts of abilities.

designer louise linderoth wheelchair model samanta bullock
Picture by Pavzo with Louise Linderoth at London Scouts LFW

I would like to work with all stakeholders in the industry to make fashion reflect society more accurately, and to create an environment wherein everybody feels welcome. In 2018, yes we have the likes of Tommy Hilfiger, River Island and ASOS to admire for their work towards this change; we have models like Kelly Knox and Madeline Stuart to inspire a new generation of models. But in 2018 I would like to see the leadership of these brands and power of these people’s stories motivating the entire fashion industry.

 

In 2018 it is not enough to leave the weight of inclusion on the shoulders of a few key players. Inclusion is about surviving and thriving together, embracing each other. Inclusion is about everybody – including you.